changelabinfo:

"Yet, despite this progress and contrary to popular perception, crisis response remains a mainstay for many organizers, service providers and advocates working with South Asian, Muslim, Arab and Sikh communities even today due to a xenophobic climate, weak public policies, and ongoing harassment and discrimination. While there is a sense that the worst of the backlash ended in the years after 9/11, many community members continue to face detention,profiling and surveillance by state and federal law enforcementbullying at schools, and hate violence. Just this week, South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT) released a report that underscores the heightened level of xenophobia and anti-Muslim sentiment in the realm of political discourse that fosters a climate for hate violence and profiling to occur more routinely. And when events occur on an international scale related to the “War on Terror”, they invariably have ramifications in neighborhoods with Arab and Muslim populations here at home.” - Deepa Iyer

operationfailure:

My friend Maggie, at the young age of 34, just found out she has a twin, and now it’s up to all of us to help her find them!
I love a mystery!
Please share this photo!

operationfailure:

My friend Maggie, at the young age of 34, just found out she has a twin, and now it’s up to all of us to help her find them!

I love a mystery!

Please share this photo!

(via newmodelminority)

Hey, AAGU! I wanted to bring this atrocious piece of journalism to your attention. CSULB’s official student newspaper The Daily 49er has recently published a racist and xenophobic article about China. [x]
Some choice quotes include:

"Also, people in China love to yell, and have no concept of using “inside voices.”"
 ”Overall, people in China neglect to follow many of the social standards that we value in the West.”
"…if I had been one of those insufferable D-bags from the Jersey Shore, I would’ve left behind dozens of people with black eyes"
"Good luck trying to find anyone who is able to speak English."

This was written by the opinions editor of the paper - this person actually manages an entire section. It’s completely unacceptable and given CSULB’s history of supporting racists - I think they should be called out. An apology is overdue, not just from the writer himself but also from the editorial team for letting such garbage be published online.
You can leave a comment on the article itself or email the editor and their faculty advisor:
Editor in Chief – eicd49er@gmail.comDaily 49er Advisor – Barbara.Kingsley-Wilson@csulb.edu
Alternatively, tweet them at @daily49er
If you want more information you can check out this post. Thanks!

Hey, AAGU! I wanted to bring this atrocious piece of journalism to your attention. CSULB’s official student newspaper The Daily 49er has recently published a racist and xenophobic article about China. [x]

Some choice quotes include:

  • "Also, people in China love to yell, and have no concept of using “inside voices.”"
  •  ”Overall, people in China neglect to follow many of the social standards that we value in the West.”
  • "…if I had been one of those insufferable D-bags from the Jersey Shore, I would’ve left behind dozens of people with black eyes"
  • "Good luck trying to find anyone who is able to speak English."

This was written by the opinions editor of the paper - this person actually manages an entire section. It’s completely unacceptable and given CSULB’s history of supporting racists - I think they should be called out. An apology is overdue, not just from the writer himself but also from the editorial team for letting such garbage be published online.

You can leave a comment on the article itself or email the editor and their faculty advisor:

Editor in Chief – eicd49er@gmail.com
Daily 49er Advisor – Barbara.Kingsley-Wilson@csulb.edu

Alternatively, tweet them at @daily49er

If you want more information you can check out this post. Thanks!

18mr:

ABC billed the show as based on the comedy of Cho, a then-25-year-old rising star on the stand-up circuit, loved (and sometimes hated) for her loud, raucous and unapologetically crude routines. (“I wanted it to be called ‘The Margaret Cho Show’ because I am such a f-ckin’ egomaniac,” she said onstage before the pilot aired.)

ButThe Margaret Cho Showit wasn’t, and that may have doomed the series from day one. Instead of inspiring laughter,All-American Girlmostly brought looks of confusion. Critics panned the show for its bad jokes, stereotyped characters and banal storylines that endorsed, rather than shattered, ethnic myths. The show’s ultimate cancellation after 19 episodes sent Cho into a spiral of depression and drug addiction, as detailed in her 2002 autobiography,I’m The One That I Want.

Cul-Intro-AS14-Inside
Photo by Todd V. Wolfson

Twenty years later, Cho, 45, has gained perspective on the experience, and with the progress in the media and society over the past two decades, holds high hopes forFresh Off The Boat—a new ABC sitcom based on Eddie Huang’s bestselling memoir about growing up as a hip-hop loving kid in suburban Orlando. It’s the first network TV show sinceAll-American Girlto be centered on an Asian American family.

Cho talks withKoreAmaboutAll-American Girland what it meant for Asian Americans, who almost never saw faces like theirs on TV. Perhaps writer Philip W. Chung summed it up best when he wrote in a 1994Los Angeles Timescolumn: “The most incredible thing about the series is that it even exists.”

Where were you in your life just before All-American Girl?
I was doing stand-up comedy, and I was traveling a lot and working a lot. I was still really young, but I wanted to become an adult, and comedy was what I thought would be the fastest path to adulthood, and it really was. I never thought about the overreaching kinds of things like race and identity. I just wanted to get out of the kind of environment that I was living in. I didn’t want to do what my family expected of me. I wasn’t going to school at the time, so that was already, like, amazingly weird and brave for an Asian American.

How did the show come about?
TV networks were giving development deals to stand-up comedians. There was a lot of that happening, a ton more than now.

Did you have much creative control?
No. No. I didn’t know how to get that, and it was never offered to me.

What did you think when you first read the script?
I thought it was really too much of a kids’ show, and it wasn’t really what I did as a stand-up comedian. They had understood me as a performer wrongly. But I wanted the show to be on the air, so I wanted to be whatever they wanted me to be. For me, this could be job security in an industry where you never know if you’re going to work again. So I just wanted to do anything to make sure the show would happen. I didn’t feel like I had the choice to argue for what I needed.

As the star of the first Asian American family sitcom on network TV, the pressure must have been immense.
I was alone in the situation. Nobody had any advice for me. I couldn’t ask anybody because nobody knew what I was going through. I was the only person who had ever done this. I had nobody who could tell me what the right move was. I was too young to understand what to do or how to deal with it, and everyone just wanted to get a show on the air. And people didn’t realize that having the first Asian American family on TV comes with a lot of cultural baggage that needs to be addressed.

And to top it off, you were criticized for your weight. (In I’m The One That I Want, Cho wrote that she was forced to lose weight rapidly—30 pounds in two weeks—which led to serious kidney failure.)
That was a major thing that came up with the initial camera tests. But it had never come up throughout the development process, and it wasn’t until we were very close to shooting that I heard that complaint. It’s a really terrifying thing to be told, “Well, you don’t qualify for this job that you’ve been a part of all this time because you’re too fat.” I have a feeling, though, that it really wasn’t about my weight. Why wouldn’t they have said something much earlier? I think they just didn’t know how to photograph Asian faces. Asian American faces, at that point, were so foreign, and they didn’t know what to do with people who were different.

When the show aired, what was the reaction from the Asian American community?
The reaction was very mixed. A lot of the younger people were excited about it because it was the first time they saw Asian Americans on TV. That’s a really big deal. Other people were angry that it wasn’t what I normally did as a comedian. And I think other people were, like, waiting to be offended by the show, but were more offended by the fact that I was chosen to do that role. My comedy is much more edgy than anything I would do on mainstream television, and my move toward mainstream television was somehow considered an offensive thing.

People were also concerned about whether you were “too Asian” or “not Asian enough.”
The weirdness of being the first Asian American—I guess, for lack of a better word—star, is that people are constantly judging you. They’re asking, ‘Where do you fit on this idea of who we are?’ With ethnic identity, there’s a right way to be and a wrong way to be, and that’s a really weird thing. The panic comes from not seeing Asians Americans on television, so the few images we do have of them become overly scrutinized.

If you’re coming into visibility, you’re the first person to write the story, and it’s very hard to do that first. What is your identity if you’ve never seen yourself before? How do you carve it out of nothing? That’s a really challenging thing as a performer.

What theAll-American Girldid was point out that we are invisible. You don’t understand invisibility until you realize that you’re not invisible anymore. It absolutely was more important than just television or just entertainment. We’re talking about this idea of visibility versus power in society. It’s a huge, huge thing.

In the past 20 years, how have media portrayals of Asian Americans changed?
There still is a lot of invisibility. But it’s better. Certainly, it’s better. There are many more Asian American characters, and the entire industry has expanded exponentially. There are so many television channels and so much more media, including online, and everything that we didn’t even have before. Now people can sort of enjoy [shows with Asian Americans] for the comedy itself, and the humor comes from this organic place. It’s a good thing.

What are your thoughts on the next Asian American family sitcom, Fresh Off The Boat?
I love what they’re doing withFresh Off The Boat. It’s really funny, the cast is really talented, and the writing is really strong. I really love Eddie Huang’s point of view and perspective. His humor is close to what I would want to do if I were to create a show. It’s like, how do you figure out who you are when you don’t see yourself out there? Here’s a kid who does just that. He finds himself. I think that’s really powerful.

Eddie and I have been in really close contact since the show started, and I feel like, oh my God, my experience actually is really valuable here. I’ll tell him things I wish I had known. What people are buying, in his brand and his image, is identity. His fans want to see themselves in him. This show can be an extension of that, so I think I’m helping him understand his importance, even though I didn’t understand mine at the time.

Cul-Intro-AS14-americangirlCul-Intro-AS14-FOB
(ABOVE) The cast of All-American Girl; (BELOW) the cast ofFresh Off the Boat, based on Eddie Huang’s book, to premiere in 2015 on ABC.

What’s new in your life?
I’m working on standup. I’m doing a new record and a new tour that I’m about to go on the road with. I’m back to doing what I really love.

How do you ultimately feel when you look back on All-American Girl?
In the end, I was really grateful to have done it. It really helped me understand a lot more about show business. When re-watching the episodes, I totally forgot some of the stuff that had happened because we were immersed in it. I was just trying to survive within the work of it. I just wanted to keep it going. I wanted to stay alive.

The cast was very close. I’m still friends with all of the actors. B.D Wong and Jodi Long, I see more often.

I’m really grateful for the effect that it had on people who grew up watching it. For a lot people, it was the first time that they saw Asian Americans on television, and that’s really cool. I feel like it did accomplish a lot. It didn’t do exactly what I thought it was going to do, but in a lot of ways, I think it did more. It was a good way to grow up.

 -JS

banchancomic:

robinha:

I’ll be bringing my Banchan in 2 pages mini comic to Baltimore comic con this weekend. It’s fresh off the press, 24 pgs of full color yummy recipes!

Baltimore comic con is this Friday through Sunday sept 5- 7, at Baltimore convention center on 1 west Pratt st, Baltimore MD.

For more info
http://baltimorecomiccon.com

Find me at table A263!

Get your hands on this yummy goodness this weekend at Baltimore comic con!

So awesome!

tw-koreanhistory:

For decades, Korean-American storeowners have faced struggles in Baltimore City. They still do.

Baltimore Magazine
September 2013
By Ron Cassie, Photography by Christopher Myers
Twenty years ago this month, Joel Lee, a 21-year-old Korean-American beginning his senior year at then-Towson State University, was robbed, shot in the face, and killed while heading to a classmate’s home in Northeast Baltimore. “He wanted to borrow a computer-science book because he was determined to get his grades even higher this year,” his friend, Folashayo Babalola, told The Baltimore Sun after the September 1993 murder. “Joel was very quiet, very ambitious,” Babalola continued. “This has really shaken me… . ” The brutal slaying also shook Baltimore’s Korean-American community, whose leaders still recall the tragedy. Already feeling under siege following attacks directed at Korean-American merchants in the 1980s and 1990s, the Lee case and trial was followed closely in the city. The acquittal of the accused two years later by an almost all African-African jury spurred a protest march downtown and appeared to reflect a troubled relationship between the Korean-American community and traditionally African-American neighborhoods where many of their businesses were located.
(It wasn’t only in Baltimore where relationships between Korean-American merchants and the African-American community were overheating. A year before Lee’s murder, in Los Angeles, Korean store owners were caught in the middle of rioting following the acquittal of white police officers in the beating of Rodney King. In New York, there had been Korean-American store boycotts.)
In Baltimore, there was also a boycott of a Korean-American-owned store, which was eventually closed by the Health Department. And there was a contentious debate over the renovation of the Lafayette and Belair Markets, where Korean-immigrant owners felt they were being pushed out by the city.
Into this fraying backdrop, the Baltimore-based Korean-American Grocers & Licensed Beverage Association of Maryland (KAGRO) was founded in 1995. Forming a nonprofit to help Korean-Americans deal with vendors and navigate the myriad city regulations had been discussed for six months, says Jay Park, who operated a Park Heights liquor store for 25 years and was an early KAGRO president. But the group’s focus quickly expanded in the wake of the Lee trial—which was followed by a wave of four Korean-American store shootings in an eight-day period in January 1997. Immediately, KAGRO began working to build relationships in local communities—starting a scholarship fund, organizing outreach events, and attending meetings. Merchants tried to develop a better relationship with the city police, which had proved a struggle, if for no other reason than the cultural and language barriers.
“The timing [of KAGRO’s launch] wasn’t tied directly to the Lee case,” says Park, “but it concentrated our attention on the most pressing issues we had to deal with, which were not problems with the vendors.”
At his son’s memorial service, Joel Lee’s father said he didn’t “want my son’s death to have no meaning.”
A generation later, Park believes something positive can be connected to that tragedy. “Up until that time, I think we had been looked at and treated differently because of our skin color, our language,” Park says. “But after that, I think people saw us coming together and began to see us as a part of the community, too.”
But it has never been easy running a corner store in Baltimore. Crime and poverty persist in wide swaths. And now, after decades of struggle on tough corners, city officials are planning to significantly reduce the number of neighborhood liquor stores—the vast majority of which are owned by Korean-Americans. In a sense, Park says, KAGRO members “feel under attack again.”
Among the first things KAGRO did 18 years ago was start a scholarship program for local students. Since then, the association has awarded about $300,000, via annual grants to students in the neighborhoods where KAGRO-member stores are located, as well as to high-school and college-age children of store owners. Two police officers are also annually awarded “appreciation” honors at a ceremony at the Greenmount Senior Center.
The scholarships, as well as different community events and outreach forums, Park says, helped defuse tensions over time. “We tried to go around and get questions from the community, we tried to listen and get the community’s perspective as well as the merchants,” Park says. There were also meetings with former Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke’s Korean liaison and municipal departments, and later with the O’Malley and Dixon administrations. By 2004, the Maryland Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights had produced a report—years in the making—that found that, while problems persisted between the African-American and Korean-American store owners, “some merchants enjoy friendly relationships in the neighborhoods where their stores are located … ” The report, however, also found that “city agencies can do more” to provide services without bias. Not that there wasn’t work needed on the store owners’ side.
“There are cultural differences between the West and East,” says Jin Wook Kang, a restaurant owner and lower Charles Village liquor-store operator. “In our home country, making eye contact is viewed as disrespectful in certain relationships, for example, between a student and a teacher; with a police officer or government official. We listen, but we look down. In our home country, we put change on the counter and push it toward a customer—it’s considered more polite than touching someone’s hand. But here, someone would tell police, ‘They’re rude, they put the change on the counter and push it toward you.’ The opposite was true. It was a misunderstanding. But things have improved a great deal.”

Read More

tw-koreanhistory:

For decades, Korean-American storeowners have faced struggles in Baltimore City. They still do.

Baltimore Magazine

September 2013

By Ron Cassie, Photography by Christopher Myers

Twenty years ago this month, Joel Lee, a 21-year-old Korean-American beginning his senior year at then-Towson State University, was robbed, shot in the face, and killed while heading to a classmate’s home in Northeast Baltimore. “He wanted to borrow a computer-science book because he was determined to get his grades even higher this year,” his friend, Folashayo Babalola, told The Baltimore Sun after the September 1993 murder. “Joel was very quiet, very ambitious,” Babalola continued. “This has really shaken me… . ” The brutal slaying also shook Baltimore’s Korean-American community, whose leaders still recall the tragedy. Already feeling under siege following attacks directed at Korean-American merchants in the 1980s and 1990s, the Lee case and trial was followed closely in the city. The acquittal of the accused two years later by an almost all African-African jury spurred a protest march downtown and appeared to reflect a troubled relationship between the Korean-American community and traditionally African-American neighborhoods where many of their businesses were located.

(It wasn’t only in Baltimore where relationships between Korean-American merchants and the African-American community were overheating. A year before Lee’s murder, in Los Angeles, Korean store owners were caught in the middle of rioting following the acquittal of white police officers in the beating of Rodney King. In New York, there had been Korean-American store boycotts.)

In Baltimore, there was also a boycott of a Korean-American-owned store, which was eventually closed by the Health Department. And there was a contentious debate over the renovation of the Lafayette and Belair Markets, where Korean-immigrant owners felt they were being pushed out by the city.

Into this fraying backdrop, the Baltimore-based Korean-American Grocers & Licensed Beverage Association of Maryland (KAGRO) was founded in 1995. Forming a nonprofit to help Korean-Americans deal with vendors and navigate the myriad city regulations had been discussed for six months, says Jay Park, who operated a Park Heights liquor store for 25 years and was an early KAGRO president. But the group’s focus quickly expanded in the wake of the Lee trial—which was followed by a wave of four Korean-American store shootings in an eight-day period in January 1997. Immediately, KAGRO began working to build relationships in local communities—starting a scholarship fund, organizing outreach events, and attending meetings. Merchants tried to develop a better relationship with the city police, which had proved a struggle, if for no other reason than the cultural and language barriers.

“The timing [of KAGRO’s launch] wasn’t tied directly to the Lee case,” says Park, “but it concentrated our attention on the most pressing issues we had to deal with, which were not problems with the vendors.”

At his son’s memorial service, Joel Lee’s father said he didn’t “want my son’s death to have no meaning.”

A generation later, Park believes something positive can be connected to that tragedy. “Up until that time, I think we had been looked at and treated differently because of our skin color, our language,” Park says. “But after that, I think people saw us coming together and began to see us as a part of the community, too.”

But it has never been easy running a corner store in Baltimore. Crime and poverty persist in wide swaths. And now, after decades of struggle on tough corners, city officials are planning to significantly reduce the number of neighborhood liquor stores—the vast majority of which are owned by Korean-Americans. In a sense, Park says, KAGRO members “feel under attack again.”

Among the first things KAGRO did 18 years ago was start a scholarship program for local students. Since then, the association has awarded about $300,000, via annual grants to students in the neighborhoods where KAGRO-member stores are located, as well as to high-school and college-age children of store owners. Two police officers are also annually awarded “appreciation” honors at a ceremony at the Greenmount Senior Center.

The scholarships, as well as different community events and outreach forums, Park says, helped defuse tensions over time. “We tried to go around and get questions from the community, we tried to listen and get the community’s perspective as well as the merchants,” Park says. There were also meetings with former Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke’s Korean liaison and municipal departments, and later with the O’Malley and Dixon administrations. By 2004, the Maryland Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights had produced a report—years in the making—that found that, while problems persisted between the African-American and Korean-American store owners, “some merchants enjoy friendly relationships in the neighborhoods where their stores are located … ” The report, however, also found that “city agencies can do more” to provide services without bias. Not that there wasn’t work needed on the store owners’ side.

“There are cultural differences between the West and East,” says Jin Wook Kang, a restaurant owner and lower Charles Village liquor-store operator. “In our home country, making eye contact is viewed as disrespectful in certain relationships, for example, between a student and a teacher; with a police officer or government official. We listen, but we look down. In our home country, we put change on the counter and push it toward a customer—it’s considered more polite than touching someone’s hand. But here, someone would tell police, ‘They’re rude, they put the change on the counter and push it toward you.’ The opposite was true. It was a misunderstanding. But things have improved a great deal.”

Read More

(Source: baltimoremagazine.net, via dianchuoidi)

18mr:

Fast food workers struggling for a wage of $15 an hour and the right to unionize participated in a nonviolent civil disobedience action last week. 

This is Emily Nguyen (ponytail) and Kalia Vang (visor). Emily is 20 years-old and a sophomore at Sacramento City College. She’s worked in fast food for a year and a half and makes California minimum wage ($9 an hour). She says, “I’m just working to breathe, to stay alive. I’m not really living life. We won’t stop till we meet our destination, till our wages go up.”

 Watch the emotional video of their arrest here, and be sure to support them on Facebook here!

(via greybunnies)

18mr:

Fast food workers struggling for a wage of $15 an hour and the right to unionize participated in a nonviolent civil disobedience action last week. 

This is Emily Nguyen (ponytail) and Kalia Vang (visor). Emily is 20 years-old and a sophomore at Sacramento City College. She’s worked in fast food for a year and a half and makes California minimum wage ($9 an hour). She says, “I’m just working to breathe, to stay alive. I’m not really living life. We won’t stop till we meet our destination, till our wages go up.”

 Watch the emotional video of their arrest here, and be sure to support them on Facebook here!

wocinsolidarity:

immigrantgirls:

hey bubs! i know i was going to release this on saturday but i figured i’ve already talked your ear off about the zine so i figured why not just do it tonite? this is the third issue of the coalition zine, a zine i founded and curate, dedicated to celebrating babes of colour. every issue is literally jam packed with submissions from the raddest people all over the world. this is our third issue and right now it is on sale at our store and also available to read online. thank you so much for your support, i’m very grateful for everything you guys have helped with and have done. 

OMG PLEASE SUPPORT

When White Women Treat You Like Shit

Asian/Arab American woman here. I am so sick and tired of the way white women act in this country (USA). I am so sick and tired of the thousands of examples of being ignored, belittled, insulted, humiliated, explained to or told about my culture, treated as though they know more than me, deserve more than me, or should always be treated like the white princess that they are.

I went to a language class yesterday. Walk in and there’s two stuck up looking white women students and a man of color teaching the class. The moment I step in the room, the two women look at me as if I’m a piece of turd that got stuck on their shoe. Then proceed to spend the next TWO hours utterly ignoring me, talking across me, and every so often making a face at me as if I’m dogshit smelling up the room. They literally never once made eye contact, spoke to me, or treated me like a human being. And we’re not talking about 12 year olds here, we’re talking about women in their 20s and 30s. I assume they couldn’t handle having a woman of color there taking attention away from “their” attractive man of color teacher. Or they’re just racist assholes who hate brown women. Who knows? 

I just sat there quaking with rage and the teacher never noticed or pretended not to notice. I hate these situations because afterwards you feel like” Oh, I should have said this” or you imagine all the things you could have done differently. But that’s the insidious nature of this type or racism- they didn’t SAY something racist or outrageous that I could have called them out on. Its the kind of racism that makes you question yourself, wonder if you’re being “oversensitive”, which is what you’ll inevitably be accused of if you call them out on it. Its the daily racism that just pokes holes in you, humiliates, embarrasses you and accumulates until you feel like you can’t take the indignity any longer.

And there’s a double trauma of racism in this country- you have these shitty things happen to you, and then there’s even more shitty things that happen to you if you point out they’re happening. I’ve had white women get angry, dismiss me, use their power to punish me when I disagree with them or point out what they’re doing. Oh and crying- that’s another white woman tactic sure to make everyone else feel bad for them and turn you into the “mean woman of color” even when it’s the white women who is the one at fault!!! And let’s just get this straight. I’m a nice, kind person. When this shit happens to me, I always point it out in a nice, constructive way. It doesn’t help.  No matter what you do it sometimes feels like a lose-lose- either you call them out and then get dismissed and even more hostility, or you stay silent and seethe and feel bad about it and end up googling “Angry Asian Girls” to find somewhere you can rant about this and get some solace and comfort. 

I usually end up speaking up about it and about 75% of the time I get backlash or dismissed. But there are a few times it has worked and the white person actually apologized and recognized the wrong they had done. What keeps me going normally is this quote by Audre Lorde, “

"When we speak we are afraid
our words will not be heard
nor welcomed
but when we are silent
we are still afraid.
So it is better to speak
remembering
we were never meant to survive.”

I wish I could say it gets better but I don’t think it does, at least not in my experience. I think what happens is you get stronger and develop a tougher skin. A few years ago I would have just seethed and seethed or internalized it as something wrong with me. Now I can look at a situation like that and basically know that it’s these women who are just racist entitled assholes and who are most likely miserable with their lives anyway. Martial arts or just punching a pillow helps too.

Alright that’s all I have to say. Feel free to cut it down if it’s too long. Just so fucking fed up after 20+ years of this treatment and need to rant about it somewhere.

announcing mobmaterial

hiiii everybody a friend and i have been working hard together to start a new blog, and i’m excited to announce that it’s launching!!

the blog is called mobmaterial and the point is to create a place that celebrates poc in counter culture/youth subcultures, which are spaces that usually represent only able-bodied, thin cis white people thereby erasing the presence and contributions of poc. this is a space for all of us to gather, celebrate each other, and share inspiration/art. this is NOT a space for yt’s or cis-males!

moreover, we want to help provide a platform for poc artists, esp those who are just starting out and want more exposure for their work. are you an artist? do you have short stories, spoken word, dance, art, etc that you want to share? this is the space for you!!

please support us as we work to make this blog grow! thank you guys! (:

I told him to “get lost!”

I was just minding my own business walking home and this guy stops me and asks me if I speak English.

I did not ignore my instincts anymore and I just told him, “Get lost! I don’t want to talk to you!”

I think that shocked him so much he only could not respond.

It makes me so upset that just because I’m an Asian woman, it automatically makes people think I am foreign.

Well, I showed him I spoke English!

But part of me feels so bad because I also had been conditioned to be nice to random strange men on the street.

Part of me wonders… What if he responded violently towards me?

I might have been hurt.

Or worse, killed because I showed my anger.

I’m suddenly very afraid….

staff:

Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

Ready? 

Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

(Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)

BREAKING: September 9th will be officially an entire month since the murder of Ferguson African-American unarmed teenage Michael Brown, at the hands of racist Ferguson PD Officer Darren Wilson. In this entire month, Officer Darren Wilson hasn’t been heard from, he has literally disappeared. He still has not been arrested, charged, or indicted in the murder of Michael Brown.

thepoliticalfreakshow:

#JusticeForMichaelBrown

(via yutke)

pag-asaharibon:

Amazons of the Huk Rebellion: Gender, Sex, and Revolution in the Philippines

Labeled “Amazons” by the national press, women played a central role in the Huk rebellion, one of the most significant peasant-based revolutions in modern Philippine history.  As spies, organizers, nurses, couriers, soldiers, and even military commanders, women worked closely with men to resist first Japanese occupation and later, after WWII, tochallenge the new Philippine republic. But in the midst of the uncertainty and violence of rebellion, these women also pursued personal lives, falling in love, becoming pregnant, and raising families, often with their male comrades-in-arms.
Drawing on interviews with over one hundred veterans of the movement, Vina A. Lanzona explores the Huk rebellion from the intimate and collective experiences of its female participants, demonstrating how their presence, and the complex questions of gender, family, and sexuality they provoked, ultimately shaped the nature of the revolutionary struggle.
Vina A. Lanzona is associate professor of history at the University of Hawai’i–Manoa.

pag-asaharibon:

Amazons of the Huk Rebellion: Gender, Sex, and Revolution in the Philippines

Labeled “Amazons” by the national press, women played a central role in the Huk rebellion, one of the most significant peasant-based revolutions in modern Philippine history.  As spies, organizers, nurses, couriers, soldiers, and even military commanders, women worked closely with men to resist first Japanese occupation and later, after WWII, tochallenge the new Philippine republic. But in the midst of the uncertainty and violence of rebellion, these women also pursued personal lives, falling in love, becoming pregnant, and raising families, often with their male comrades-in-arms.

Drawing on interviews with over one hundred veterans of the movement, Vina A. Lanzona explores the Huk rebellion from the intimate and collective experiences of its female participants, demonstrating how their presence, and the complex questions of gender, family, and sexuality they provoked, ultimately shaped the nature of the revolutionary struggle.

Vina A. Lanzona is associate professor of history at the University of Hawai’i–Manoa.

(Source: uwpress.wisc.edu)